Menu

Video Recordings

Getting Ready for Your Video Recordings

Here are some suggestions for presenting your content on camera, including what to wear and how to speak to the camera. If you are interested in a one-on-one consultation or would like to practice any of the ideas below, please contact Lauren Owens at lowens@upenn.edu. 

What to Wear on Camera

 

Men:

  • Avoid stark white or bright yellow shirts that tend to reflect light and be too vivid on camera.

  • Avoid black suits, which tend to diminish your appearance because they absorb too much light.

  • Avoid dress shirts with pinstripes close together. Lines close together tend to flutter on camera.

  • Avoid fabrics with complicated patterns such as checks, close stripes, herringbones, tweeds, and loud plaids. Fabrics of this design tend to strobe on camera.

  • Avoid neckties with bold, tightly designed patterns, including plaids, polka dots and shiny fabrics. They too will flutter on camera.

  • Avoid shiny jewelry and metal tie clips, which reflect light back into the lens of the camera.

  • Bring a medium colored suit, if possible. Best bets are blue/dark blue, gray, and brown.

  • Bring two or three neckties that match your suit (to try out on camera). Make sure neckties are non-shiny and loosely patterned.

  • If you do not wear a dress suit, bring solid colored clothes. Best bets are navy blues, purples, dark creams and browns.

  • Bring clothes made of natural fabrics that tend to breathe easily under the warm studio lights.

  • Bring comfortable shoes.

 

 Women: 

  • Avoid stark white, bright yellow and red suits that tend to reflect light and be too vivid on camera.

  • Avoid black suits, which tend to diminish your appearance because they absorb too much light.

  • Avoid white blouses that reflect light into the camera.

  • Avoid highly shiny or glossy fabrics that reflect light back into the camera.

  • Avoid fabrics with complicated patterns such as checks, tight/close stripes, herringbones and tweeds. Fabrics of this design tend to strobe on camera.

  • Avoid jewelry that rattles, clicks and clanks such as multiple bracelets or long necklaces. These tend to brush up against your microphone, causing distracting noise.

  • Bring solid colored clothes. Best bets are navy blues, grays, purples, dark creams, browns, and neutral colored suits.

  • Bring clothes made of natural fabrics that tend to breathe easily under the warm studio lights.

  • Bring simple jewelry. If you are unsure about certain pieces, bring alternate ones.

  • Style your hair off your face to avoid shadows.

  • Bring a variety of lipsticks; some will look better on camera than others.

Tips for Speaking on Camera

  • Enunciate your words - It is important that you speak clearly and correctly. 

  • Speak at a moderate pace - Use a normal speaking pace, not too slow or too fast.

  • Make sentences simple and concise - If you watch a TV news program, you will notice that the anchorperson speaks in short sound bites. It is easier for people to retain information if it is provided in short sound bites.

  • Change the inflection of your voice - Using a monotone voice will put your students to sleep. If you change the inflection of your voice, it draws your students' attention back to you. A great way to highlight a key point is to raise your voice inflection.

  • Consider your audience - Some comments may not be appropriate for everyone in your global audience. Do your best to avoid offending someone in your audience. Be tactful when using humor.

  • Smile! - Your expression shows in your voice. By smiling, you are projecting a positive tone.

 

Notes on Movement and Expression

  • Make eye contact - Although you are not speaking face-to-face, you will be more effective if you appear to be speaking directly to your students. You can achieve this by looking straight ahead at the camera in front of you.

  • Avoid only using your eyes to look at your slides - You will look shifty-eyed if you are glancing at your slides or notes. Turn your head when you need to reference your notes instead.

  • Avoid looking down too often - Be familiar with your content so you will not need to look down. Eye and head movement downward emphasizes your lack of comfort with the content.

  • Try not to hit the microphone - If you move your hands, avoid hitting the microphone in order to prevent the thud on your audio.

  • Smile! - Smiling is the surest way to win over an audience. It conveys a positive spirit for the program and makes participants more willing to join in.


These tips were modified from http://www.nacubo.org/Distance_Learning/Speakers_Corner.html