Menu

Art & Culture

  • Philadelphia Art & Culture Fair

Highlights from the Philadelphia Art and Culture Fair

  • Philadelphia Art and Culture Fair
Next Story Previous Story

Highlights from the Philadelphia Art and Culture Fair

By Lauren Shapiro

If you’re wondering why a man in gold and red Roman battle regalia was chatting with students in front of Wynn Commons recently, you have come to the right place. On Friday, September 27, Platt  Student Performing Arts House hosted an Art and Culture Fair that featured a colorful array of Philadelphia organizations, each offering students unique and affordable access to their upcoming programs. The gladiator, who represented the Penn Museum, gave me an enthusiastic high-five and told me about Hijinks with the Sphinx, a celebration of the Sphinx’s 100th year at the museum on October 19th. In addition to the fair and the many art and culture discounts offered there, 500 Penn freshmen were given Open Arts key tagsat the beginning of the semester. These tags, distributed through Freshman Art and Culture Seminars and College House Residential Programs, allow students to create accounts at www.openartsphilly.com and access free events from select art and culture groups throughout the city.

    • Philadelphia Art and Culture Fair
    • Philadelphia Art and Culture Fair
    • Philadelphia Art and Culture Fair
    • Philadelphia Art and Culture Fair
    • Philadelphia Art and Culture Fair
    • Philadelphia Art and Culture Fair
    • Philadelphia Art and Culture Fair
    • Philadelphia Art and Culture Fair
    • Philadelphia Art and Culture Fair
    • Philadelphia Art and Culture Fair
    • Philadelphia Art and Culture Fair

Here are some awesome events highlighted at the fair or offered through Open Arts: 


1.  17 Border Crossings at Fringe Arts (November 13-17): Fringe Arts, overlooking the river in scenic Old City, is the perfect place to go for a night of contemporary performance art. Fringe Arts performances are both artistically and culturally diverse, employing multimedia and drawing upon inspiration from around the world. On November 13th, Director Thaddeus Phillips will present 17 Border Crossingsa performance that explores the concept of borders and other cultural and geopolitical themes. This description of 17 Border Crossings fascinated me so much, I went ahead and bought tickets for November 13th.


2.   Parade and Stick Fly at the Arden Theatre (September 26-November 3): The Arden Theatre’s first main stage show of the season is Parade. Parade is a historically based musical about Leo Frank, a Jewish factory superintendent in Atlanta who was lynched by a mob of prominent Georgia citizens after being wrongfully convicted of murdering a 13-year-old female factory worker in 1913. Following Parade, The Arden Theatre’s main stage will welcome Stick Flya play about two sons in a wealthy African American family who bring their girlfriends home for the first time. For all shows, the Arden Theatre offers $2-off general student discounts and $10 student tickets up to 30 minutes before the show. 


3.   The Idan Raichel Project at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts (October 24): Idan Raichel, a famous Israeli singer-songwriter, is known for synthesizing  Ethiopian (Amharic), Hebrew, and Arabic music with tinges of electronica and piano. This event is free for all Open Arts members. I strongly recommend this event; I saw Idan Raichel in Atlanta a few years ago, and he has since become my favorite world musician.


4.   The Herero of Namibia at InterAct Theatre Company (October 18-November 10): When I stopped to chat at the InterAct booth, the representatives billed this event as one that makes them particularly proud and excited. A theatrical presentation by renowned playwright Jackie Sibblies Drury, The Herero of Namibia highlights the story of the Herero genocide, a key moment in early 20th century Namibian history. InterAct is an organization that strives to educate audiences through profound productions; Herero fits that bill.  


5.   Emerging Arts Leaders: Conundrums in Art Advocacy (October 24): On October 24th, Emerging Arts Leaders, an organization working to expand Philadelphia’s vibrant arts scene and prepare a new generation of leaders in the arts, will facilitate a discussion on the role of artists as advocates and the challenges regarding advocacy that face artists and administrators. The event is free for everyone, and will be a phenomenal opportunity for students interested in arts leadership to network and gain insight in the field. You can RSVP by clicking here.


The concept of a “free-pass” to art and culture events for Philadelphia students began with Drexel’s Cultural Passport program. Following the success of Cultural Passport, Campus Philly developed the region-wide Open Arts program, which provides discounted or free access for students to a great deal of the Philadelphia arts scene. If interested in joining the program, please visit openartsphilly.org/activate to create an account. Registration code: CampusPhilly

 

Lauren Shapiro is a sophomore in the College of Arts and Sciences, majoring in Political Science and English with a concentration in Creative Writing. Aside from writing for Penn Art & Culture, Lauren co-directs Penn’s poetry workshop and performance collective, The Body Electric. She also serves on the executive board of SREHUP (Student Run Emergency Housing Unit of Philadelphia), an inter-college organization that supports and volunteers for homeless shelters citywide. In her free time, Lauren enjoys writing, playing piano, traveling, and eating sugary foods.


Edited by Naomi Shavin.